Shire of Mundaring

Census data notes

Population

The data on this page are sourced from a variety of different tables and designed to give a range of population and dwelling numbers for the area.

All data excludes Overseas Visitors except for the “Overseas visitors” category.

Please note that “Population” referred to on this page relates entirely to Census population (either Enumerated or Usual Residence). For the current official population estimates (ERP) please refer to the “Population estimates” page.

‘Eligible voters’ includes all Australian citizens over the age of 18 on Census day.

‘Overseas Visitors’ includes all people whose usual residence is outside Australia, and who plan to be in Australia for less than 12 months. They are normally excluded from all tables within profile.id but are included separately here for reference. This item relates only to enumerated population, as by definition there are no usual residents who are overseas visitors.

‘Total dwellings’ includes both private and non-private dwellings. All dwellings data are based on place of enumeration.

'Average household size’ consists of the number of persons counted in private dwellings divided by the number of occupied private dwellings on Census night. For consistency with earlier years, 2011 figures for Average Household Size include overseas visitors where they are staying in private dwellings. This is expected to have negligible effect on the total, and it enables comparison between all years back to 1991.

‘Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander population’ includes all persons who answered question 7 on the Census form “Is the person of Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander origin?” with either “Yes, Aboriginal”, “Yes, Torres Strait Islander” or both. It is not derived from the “Australian Aboriginal” response to the Ancestry question, and this population can have any birthplace.

‘Australian born' includes ‘Australia (includes external territories), nfd’ – This is due to a coding error by the ABS whereby the Australian-born population of prisons in Western Australia were incorrectly included in this category. It has no impact for areas outside WA or which are in WA but don’t have a prison population.

‘Speaks a language other than English at home’ includes all persons who identified a language other than English as their main language spoken at home, but doesn’t include those with language not stated.

Service age groups

Derived from the Census question:

'What is the person's date of birth (or age last birthday)?'

Groups the population by age into categories which reflect a similar life stage or service user profiles.

Includes all persons except 'Overseas Visitors'.

  • 0-4 Babies and pre-schoolers
  • 5-11 Primary Schoolers
  • 12-17 Secondary Schoolers
  • 18-24 Tertiary education and transition to independence
  • 25-34 Young workforce
  • 35-49 Parents and homebuilders
  • 50-59 Older workforce and emerging empty nesters
  • 60-69 Empty nesters and retirees
  • 70-84 Seniors
  • 85+ Frail aged

If an answer to the Age question is not provided, the Australian Bureau of Statistics imputes the age of the respondent, so there is no "Not stated" category for this variable.

For more information on the data quality of Age, please refer to the Age data quality statement on the ABS website.

Five year age groups

Derived from the Census question:

'What is the person's date of birth (or age last birthday)?'

Five year age groups provide equal age cohorts enabling direct comparison between all ages without distortion.

Includes all persons except 'Overseas Visitors'.

If an answer to the Age question is not provided, the Australian Bureau of Statistics imputes the age of the respondent, so there is no "Not stated" category for this variable.

For more information on the data quality of Age, please refer to the Age data quality statement on the ABS website.

Single year of age

Derived from the Census question:

'What is the person's date of birth (or age last birthday)?'

Presents single year of age data in an age-sex pyramid

Includes all persons except 'Overseas Visitors'.

Enables the identification of small groups and small changes in age structure over time as well as comparison by gender. Males appear on the left of the chart, and females presented to the same scale appear on the right of the chart.

If an answer to the Age question is not provided, the Australian Bureau of Statistics imputes the age of the respondent, so there is no "Not stated" category for this variable.

For more information on the data quality of Age, please refer to the Age data quality statement on the ABS website.

Ancestry

Derived from the Census question:

'What is the person's ancestry?'

Multi-response

Ancestry data are coded using the Australian Standard Classification of Cultural and Ethnic Groups (ASCCEG).

Includes all persons.

There is an element of subjectivity to ancestry, which is not present in birthplace or language data. Ancestry can represent a person's understanding of their own affiliations, rather than any objective measure of genealogy.

'Other Oceanian' includes Solomon Islander, Ni-Vanuatu, New Caledonian, I-Kiribati, Nauruan and others

'Other Polynesian' includes Hawaiian, Niuean, Tahitian, Tuvaluan and Tokelauan.

'Other British' includes British, nfd, Manx, Channel Islander

'Other North-Western European' includes Flemish, Frisian, Northern European nfd, Icelandic and others

Other Southern/South East European' includes Basque, Roma/Gypsy, Montenegrin, Moldovan and others

'Other Eastern European' includes Belarusan, Eastern European nfd and others

'Other Arab peoples' includes Algerian, Kuwaiti, Libyan, Moroccan, Tunisian and others

'Sudanese' includes Sudanese, South Sudanese, Dinka, Nuer, Darfurian and others.

'Other Middle eastern peoples' includes Coptic, Mandaean and Berber.

'Other South East Asian' includes Balinese, Javanese, Sundanese and others.

'Other Northern Asian' includes Mongolian and Tibetan.

'Other Indian subcontinent' includes Burgher, Gujarati, Malayali, Bhutanese, Sikh, and others.

'Tamil' includes Tamil, nfd, Sri Lankan Tamil, Indian Tamil.

'Other Central Asian' includes Georgian, Kazakh, Pathan, Uzbek, Hazara and others.

'American' includes American and African American

'Other North American' includes Hispanic, Bermudan and others.

'Other South American' includes Bolivian, Ecuadorian, Guyanese, Venezuelan and Paraguayan.

'Other Central American' includes Nicaraguan, Costa Rican and others.

'Caribbean Islander' includes Jamaican, Cuban, Trinidadian and others.

'Central and West African' includes Ghanian, Nigerian, Liberian, Sierra Leonian, Senegalese, Congolese and others.

'Other Southern and East African' includes Kenyan, Oromo, Tanzanian, Ugandan, Zambian and others.

'Inadequately Described' includes 'African, so described', 'Asian, so described' and 'European, so described'.

Please note the following issues with specific ancestry groups:

'Cypriot' was not collected in 2001. For the 2001 series Cypriot is included in 'Other Southern/Eastern European' which makes this category not directly comparable between 2001 and later years.

'Burmese peoples' includes Burmese, Anglo-Burmese, Mon, Karen and Chin. Karen was not separately identified in 2001 and Chin was not in 2006. These are two significant emerging groups in Australia, but have been combined into 'Burmese peoples' to enable comparisons with earlier years.

'Serbian/Yugoslavian' includes "Serbian" and "South Eastern European, nfd", which contains primarily people who in 2011 stated their ancestry as "Yugoslavian". Previously these were coded to "Serbian", so the categories have been combined for comparability in 2011.

'Bengali/Bangladeshi' includes 'Bengali' and the new 2011 category 'Bangladeshi'. People who responded 'Bangladeshi' in 2006 were coded to 'Bengali' so the two categories have been combined for comparability in 2011.

'Sri Lankan/Sinhalese' includes 'Sri Lankan' and 'Sinhalese'. Sri Lankan ancestry is a new category for 2011, which was previously combined with Sinhalese so these two categories have been combined to make the category comparable over time.

Respondents can nominate up to two ancestries, and data are presented as multi-response. The numbers are a count of individual responses, but the percentages are expressed as a proportion of all people, meaning individuals can be counted twice in the table and percentages can add to more than 100%.

IMPORTANT NOTE ABOUT COUNTING RESPONSES

Please note that the 'Other ancestry' category in the table is not entirely a count of responses, nor entirely a count of persons. A total of 125 ancestry groupings were ordered from the ABS, covering most of the major ancestries included in the population. For the 'Other' categories mentioned above, if a respondent nominated two ancestries which both fall into the same 'other' category, they are only counted once in this table. However if they nominated ancestries which fell into two different categories in this table, they are counted twice. This includes ancestries which have had to be combined in 2011 for time series comparability, such as Sudanese.

For example if a person nominated two ancestries, 'Nuer' and 'Darfurian', these would be counted in the table as a single response in the category 'Sudanese'. However if the person had nominated 'Nuer' and 'Morroccan', they would be counted as two responses in the table, once in 'Sudanese' and once in 'Other Arab Peoples'. Though the number of potential combinations which have this issue is large, they mostly represent unlikely combinations of ancestries, and for the most part, ancestries have been included in 'Other' categories due to their very low number of responses anyway. For this reason, the issue is likely to have a negligible effect on the data. In 2006, only about 20% of the population nominated more than one ancestry.

For more information about this topic, please refer to the ABS data quality statement on Ancestry.

Birthplace

Derived from the Census question:

'In which country was the person born?'

Country of Birth is classified using the Standard Australian Classification of Countries (2011) (ABS Cat. No. 1269.0)

Includes all persons.

The top 10 countries of birth for the selected area are shown in this table. The table is generated from a list of 125 birthplace which make up 99.2% of the overseas-born population of Australia. These birthplaces have been defined to enable direct comparison over time back to 1991, with the exceptions listed below. It is possible that a country of birth from outside this top 125 would feature in the top 10 list if it was separately included, but at present these are only shown in the 'Total Overseas Born' category. All 125 countries of birth are available in the Download Data section on this site. The full list of approximately 300 countries of birth is available on request from .id.

'United Kingdom' includes England, Scotland, Wales, Northern Ireland, Channel Islands, Isle of Man, and 'United Kingdom not further defined'.

'Serbia/Montenegro (fmr Republic of Yugoslavia)' includes Serbia and Montenegro, as well as 'South Eastern Europe nfd' in 2011 and 2006. Those people categorised to South Eastern Europe were primarily those who stated their birthplace as Yugoslavia, which did not exist as a nation in 2006. In 2001 it includes all people who listed their birthplace as Yugoslavia, while it is not available for 1996 and 1991 due to considerable changes to national boundaries in this region.

'China' excludes Taiwan, Macau and Hong Kong.

'Sudan' includes South Sudan. South Sudan is a new country which declared independence in 2011 and was recorded in the 2011 Census. For comparison with earlier Census years, data has been recombined for 2011 standard output.

'Bhutan' was available as a country of birth in 2006 and earlier years but has not been included in the profile for these years due to very small numbers in Australia. In 2006, there were only 137 people from Bhutan in Australia. It is included in 2011.

'Main English speaking countries' includes Canada, Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa, the United Kingdom, and the United States of America.

'Non-English speaking backgrounds' refers to persons born in countries not included in 'Main English speaking countries'.

For more information on this topic please refer to the ABS data quality statement on Country of Birth.

'Not Stated' includes 'Inadequately Described' and 'At sea'.

Year of arrival in Australia

Derived from the Census question:

'In what year did the person first arrive in Australia to live here for one year or more?'

Includes persons born overseas who intend to be in Australia for at least one year.

Excludes people born in Australia and those who did not state a country of birth.

The data are displayed in 5 year groupings based on intercensal periods.

For more information on this topic, please see the ABS data quality statement for Year of Arrival.

Proficiency in English

Derived from the Census question:

'How well does the person speak English?'

English proficiency aims to measure the ability of persons who speak English as a Second Language to also speak English.

Includes all persons who speak a language other than English at home.

Excludes people who speak English at home.

When viewed with other ethnic and cultural indicators, the data tends to reflect the ethnic composition of the population and the number of years of residence in Australia.

In general, an area with a high proportion of migrants who have lived in Australia for many years, and/or have higher education levels, will have a higher proportion of those who speak English well or very well. Conversely, an area with many recent non-English speaking migrants, from lower socio-economic backgrounds (particularly refugees) will often have a higher proportion of those who speak English not well or not at all.

Note: A person's English proficiency is based on a subjective assessment and should therefore be treated with caution.

Responses to the question on Proficiency in English in the Census are subjective. For example, one respondent may consider that a response of 'Well' is appropriate if they can communicate well enough to do the shopping, while another respondent may consider such a response appropriate only for people who can hold a social conversation. Proficiency in English should be considered as an indicator of a person's ability to speak English and not a definitive measure of this ability.

For more information on proficiency in English, please refer to the Proficiency in English data quality statement on the ABS website.

Language spoken at home

Derived from the Census question:

'Does the person speak a language other than English at home?'

Language spoken at home is coded using the Australian Standard Classification of Languages, 2011 (ABS Cat. No. 1267.0)

Language spoken at home is designed to measure 'first' or 'native' language, though some migrants who have been in Australia for many years may speak English at home is recorded.

Includes all persons.

Excludes multi-lingual populations. E.g. If I speak English and French, but mainly speak English at home, the fact that I speak French is not captured.

The top 10 languages are shown provided they have more than 20 speakers. These top 10 are sorted from a list of 100 languages which combined make up 98.5% of the non-English speaking population of Australia in 2011. The full list of over 500 languages is available on request from .id.

'Not stated' includes the category 'Inadequately described'.

Some languages are not available for earlier Census years. Issues are as follows:

'Tagalog' includes Filipino, which was recorded as a separate language from Tagalog in the 2006 and 2011 Censuses, but no such distinction was made in earlier Censuses. Filipino is a standardised version of Tagalog, incorporating words from other indigenous languages within the Philippines.

'Persian' includes Dari, which was recorded as a separate language from Persian in the 2006 and 2011 Censuses, but no distinction was made in earlier Censuses. Dari is a localised name for Persian in Afghanistan.

'Min Nan' was recorded in 2011 to represent the languages previously recorded as Hokkien and Teochew, correctly classifying these as a single language. For comparability, Hokkien and Teochew have been combined in earlier Censuses.

'Assyrian/Aramaic' includes Assyrian, Chaldean and Aramaic languages.

'African Languages, nec' is no longer available due to the separation of many African languages into their own categories. These separated African languages are not available in time series.

Please note that due to substantial changes in the language classification between 1991 and 1996, it is not possible to provide data on the full list of languages in 1991. The classification is non-comparable, so when 1991 is selected, only “Speaks English only” and “Non-English total” are provided.

Religion

Derived from the Census question:

'What is the person's religion?'

Religion is coded using the Australian Standard Classification of Religious Groups (ASCRG), 2011.

The religion question in the Census is an optional question and so has a relatively high rate of 'Not Stated' responses.

Includes all persons.

The classification for Religion has changed significantly over the last 20 years. To make it possible to compare religious affiliation over time the full list of 140 religions has been aggregated into 46 categories. The top 10 religious groups for the Shire of Mundaring are presented from the aggregated list. All 46 categories are available in Download Data on this site and the full list of 140 religions collected in the Census is available from .id on request.

'Other Eastern Catholic' includes Melkite, Ukrainian and Chaldean.

'Other Oriental Orthodox' includes Syrian and Ethiopian Orthodox churches.

'Assyrian Apostolic' includes the Assyrian and Ancient Churches of the East.

'Other Eastern Orthodox' includes Antiochian, Romanian, Ukrainian Orthodox.

'Other Protestant includes Born Again Christian, Congregational, Evangelical Churches, Wesleyan Methodist Church and others.

'Other Christian' includes Ratana (Maori), Quakers, Christian Science, Gnostic Christians, New Apostolic Church and Temple Society.

'Christian, not further described' includes written responses of 'Christian'(no denomination specified), Apostolic Church, Church of God.

'Other Nature Religions' includes Animism, Druidism, Pantheism.

'Chinese and Japanese Religions' includes Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto and Ancestor Veneration.

'Other Non-Christian Religions' includes Scientology, Rastafarianism, Jaianism, Theosophy, Satanism and Zoroastrianism.

'Non Classifiable Religious Belief' includes Theism, 'Not Defined', and other responses including Jedi.

'No Religion' includes 'No Religion (not further described)', Atheism, Humanism, Rationalism and Agnosticism.

Individual income

Derived from the Census question:

'What is the total of all wages/salaries, government benefits, pensions, allowances and other income the person usually receives?'

Individual income data presents the total gross income (including pensions and allowances) that a person usually receives each week.

Includes persons aged 15 years and over.

Only 2011 data are presented for this topic as income ranges are altered every five years to adjust for inflation and wages growth so comparison over time is not possible.

Individual income quartiles

Derived from the Census question:

'What is the total of all wages/salaries, government benefits, pensions, allowances and other income the person usually receives?'

See notes for Individual income as well.

Individual income categories are not comparable over time because of the influences of economic change such as inflation. Income quartiles are the most objective method of comparing change in the income profile of a community over time.

Individual income quartiles look at the distribution of incomes in the area of interest relative to Western Australia. Income quartiles are created for Western Australia by ranking individuals from the lowest incomes to the highest incomes and then dividing the list into four equal groups or quartiles. This is repeated for each Census period. The table shows the income categories for each quartile in each Census period.

For the purposes of calculating quartiles, individuals not stating their income in the Census are excluded.

Enumerated quartile group dollar ranges (Individuals)
Calculated from income data for Western Australia Weekly income by Census year
Individual quartile ranges
2011
2006
2001
1996
1991
Lowest group $0 to $285 $0 to $219 $0 to $178 $0 to $147 $0 to $123
Medium lowest $286 to $663 $220 to $500 $179 to $373 $148 to $307 $124 to $265
Medium highest $664 to $1,276 $501 to $942 $374 to $690 $308 to $572 $266 to $486
Highest group $1,277 and over $943 and over $691 and over $573 and over $487 and over

The analysis shows the number and proportion of individuals in the Shire of Mundaring falling into each of the four quartiles. This gives a clear picture of how incomes in the Shire of Mundaring compare to Western Australia. In Western Australia 25% of persons fall into each category by definition. If, for example, the the Shire of Mundaring has 35% in the top category and only 15% in the lowest, this indicates that the the Shire of Mundaring has proportionally more high income individuals and less low income individuals.

More importantly, the dataset for Western Australia is grouped into those four equal categories for each Census back to 1991 independently. Repeating this process for each Census period, enables a comparison of areas over time, because the quartile becomes a constant, regardless of the dollar amounts involved enabling you to track change in a local area independent of inflation. For example, if the Shire of Mundaring has had an increase in the number of individuals in the top income quartile, this indicates that incomes are increasing in real terms, relative to other parts of the State.

Household income

Derived from the Census question:

'What is the total of all wages/salaries, government benefits, pensions, allowances and other income the person usually receives?'

Household income data presents the total weekly incomes of all persons over the age of 15 in the household.

Excludes 'Other non-classifiable households'.

Only 2011 data are presented for this topic as income ranges are altered every five years to adjust for inflation and wages growth so comparison over time is not possible.

For income in time series, please see Household Income Quartiles.

'Partial income not stated' includes households where at least one, but not all, member(s) aged 15 years and over did not state an income and/or at least one household member aged 15 years and over was temporarily absent. In these cases, the aggregate of all stated individual incomes would be less than the true household income so these households are excluded from the calculation.

'All incomes not stated' includes households where no members present stated an income, and these are also excluded.

As individual income is collected in ranges, in order to calculate household income, a dollar value has to be imputed by the ABS to each range, then the individual incomes are aggregated, and output into ranges again. There is an inherent uncertainty in this process, so household incomes should only be treated as a guide to the income level in an area, not an exact calculation. For more information on income imputation, please see the ABS Fact Sheet – Income in the Census.

For more information on this topic, please see the ABS data quality statement on Total Household Income (HIND).

Household income quartiles

Derived from the Census question:

'What is the total of all wages/salaries, government benefits, pensions, allowances and other income the person usually receives?'

See notes for Household incomes as well.

Household income categories are not comparable over time because of the influences of economic change such as inflation. Income quartiles are the most objective method of comparing change in the income profile of a community over time.

Household income quartiles look at the distribution of incomes in the area of interest relative to Western Australia. Income quartiles are created for Western Australia by ranking households from the lowest incomes to the highest incomes and then dividing the list into four equal groups or quartiles. This is repeated for each Census period. The table shows the income categories for each quartile in each Census period.

For the purposes of calculating quartiles, households not stating their income in the Census are excluded.

Quartile group dollar ranges (Households)
Calculated from income data for Western Australia Weekly income by Census year
Household income ranges
2011
2006
2001
1996
1991
Lowest group $0 to $693 $0 to $565 $0 to $416 $0 to $348 $0 to $305
Medium lowest $694 to $1,405 $566 to $1,062 $417 to $783 $349 to $651 $306 to $556
Medium highest $1,406 to $2,507 $1,063 to $1,774 $784 to $1,311 $652 to $1,094 $557 to $910
Highest group $2,508 and over $1,775 and over $1,312 and over $1,095 and over $911 and over

The analysis shows the number and proportion of households in the Shire of Mundaring falling into each of the four quartiles. This gives a clear picture of how incomes in the Shire of Mundaring compare to Western Australia. In Western Australia 25% of households fall into each category by definition. If for example, the Shire of Mundaring has 35% in the top category and only 15% in the lowest, this indicates that the Shire of Mundaring has proportionally more high income households and less low income households.

More importantly, the dataset for Western Australia is grouped into those four equal categories for each Census back to 1991 independently. Repeating this process for each Census period, enables a comparison of areas over time, because the quartile becomes a constant, regardless of the dollar amounts involved enabling you to track change in a local area independent of inflation. For example, if the Shire of Mundaring has had an increase in the number of households in the top income quartile, this indicates that incomes are increasing in real terms, relative to other parts of the State.

Equivalised household income quartiles

Derived from the Census question:

'What is the total of all wages/salaries, government benefits, pensions, allowances and other income the person usually receives?'

Equivalised household income can be viewed as an indicator of the economic resources available to a standardised household.

For a lone person household equivalised income is equal to household income. For a household comprising more than one person, it is an indicator of the household income that would be needed by a lone person household to enjoy the same level of economic wellbeing.

As an example, consider the case of a family of two adults, and three children aged 8, 13 and 16. If they have a household income of $2,000 per week, it is clearly not reasonable to compare their income to that of a lone person household with an income of $2,000 per week who would have far less living expenses. However it is also not reasonable to simply divide the income by the five people in the household, as there are economies of scale in larger households.

This is why equivalised household income divides the household income by an equivalence factor, according to the 'modified OECD' equivalence scale. This factor is derived by adding the following:

  • First Adult + 1
  • Second and subsequent adults, and children over 15 +0.5
  • Children under 15 + 0.3

So our family of 5 would have an equivalence factor of 2.6 (1 for the first adult, 2 additional adults at 0.5, and 2 children under 15 at 0.3). Income is divided by this to arrive at the equivalised household income, which in this case would be $769. This is the income a lone person would need to have to be equivalent in living standards to this family of five.

Because it is only RELATIVE equivalised income that matters, rather than the actual dollar amount, only income quartiles are presented on this page. For details of how quartiles are calculated and used, please see the data notes for Household income quartiles.

For more information about the calculation of Equivalised Household Income, please see the ABS data quality statement.

Highest qualification achieved

Derived from the Census question:

'What is the level of the highest qualification the person has completed?'

This topic includes all persons aged 15 years and over. It relates to the level of the highest qualification achieved excluding school-based qualifications, as of Census day.

Qualification levels are presented in descending order (of educational and time requirements), with Postgraduate Degrees being the highest, and “No qualification” the lowest. To be included, qualifications must be within scope of the question – that is, recognised by or equivalent to a qualification by an Australian university or tertiary institution.

‘Vocational’ includes all Certificate level qualifications, usually associated with trades. Note that it is not always necessary to have completed year 12 to obtain a Certificate level qualification, so the total of those with non-school qualifications should not be taken as the number of people who have completed year 12. This is contained within the “Highest level of schooling” topic.

For more information please refer to the data quality statement for Highest Level of Schooling on the ABS website.

Highest secondary school year completed

Derived from the Census question:

'What is the highest year of primary or secondary school the person has completed?'

Only 2006 and 2011 data are available for this topic, due to a change in the scope and wording of the question between 2001 and 2006 which makes earlier data non-comparable.

Includes persons aged 15 years and over.

'Schooling' refers to primary and secondary schooling only, regardless of post-school qualifications achieved.

For those respondents still at school, they are asked to mark their highest level of schooling completed to the previous year.

Where respondents went to school overseas, they are advised to mark the box that most closely matches the school level they achieved in their country of origin.

For more information about this topic, please refer to the data quality statement for Highest Year of School Completed on the ABS website.

Education institution attending

Derived from the Census question:

'What type of educational institution is the person attending?'

Includes all persons

'Independent' refers to private and other non-Government schools. 'Catholic' refers to infant, primary and secondary schools run independently by the Catholic Church.

'TAFE' refers to Technical and Further Education institutions.

'Tertiary education' is usually taken to mean University and TAFE education.

'Not Attending' indicates that question 25 was not applicable because the person answered 'No' to question 24, which asks whether the person was attending an educational institution.

'Not stated' indicates that the person either did not state whether or not they were a student, or did not state what institution they were attending (or both).

Results for this question are closely linked to the age structure of the population e.g. areas with large numbers of children will have high levels of school attendance.

For more information about this topic, please refer to the data quality statement for Type of Educational Institution Attending on the ABS website.

Need for assistance

Derived from the Census questions:

'Does the person ever need someone to help with, or be with them for, self care activities?', 'Does the person ever need someone to help with, or be with them for, body movement activities?', 'Does the person ever need someone to help with, or be with them for, communication activities?', and 'What are the reasons for the need for assistance or supervision shown in questions 20, 21 and 22?' (as per above).

This data identifies people who report a need for assistance due to a 'profound or severe core activity limitation'. This population is defined as people who need assistance in their day to day lives with any or all of the following activities – self-care, body movements or communication – because of a disability, long-term health condition, or old age.

This question relies on people evaluating themselves, (or their carers), as being in need of assistance. Consequently this question provides an indication of the characteristics of people who report, or are reported as requiring, a need for assistance; but cannot be relied upon to provide details as to the total number of people with a 'profound or severe core activity limitation'.

Persons under the age of 40 whose only stated reason for need for assistance was ‘old or young age’ are included under ‘no need for assistance’.

This should not be viewed as the total population with a disability, as many people with a disability do not require assistance, and would therefore likely answer "no" to this question. For more information on types and levels of disability (including those not requiring assistance) please refer to the ABS publication 4430.0, Survey of Disability, Ageing and Carers.

Excludes 'Overseas Visitors'.

Voluntary work

Derived from the Census question:

'In the last twelve months did the person spend any time doing voluntary work through an organisation or group?'

Only 2006 and 2011 data are available for this topic as the question was only asked for the first time in 2006.

Includes persons aged 15 years and over.

Includes voluntary work undertaken in the 12 months prior to the Census.

Includes help willingly given in the form of time, service or skills, to a club, organisation or association including:

  • assisting at events and with sports organisations
  • helping with school events and activities
  • assisting in churches, hospitals, nursing homes and charities
  • other kinds of volunteer work (e.g. emergency services)

Excludes unpaid work done through a club, organisation or association mainly in order to qualify for government benefits such as Newstart Allowance.

Excludes any activity which is part of a person's paid employment or family business.

For more information about this topic, please refer to the data quality statement for Voluntary Work on the ABS website.

Unpaid domestic work

Derived from the Census question:

'In the last week did the person spend time doing unpaid domestic work for their household?'

Only 2006 and 2011 data are available for this topic as the question was only asked for the first time in 2006.

Includes persons aged 15 years and over.

Includes domestic work undertaken in the week prior to Census night.

Includes all the domestic work a person does without pay in their own home and in other places, for themselves, their family and other people in their household including:

  • meal preparation, service and clean-up
  • washing, ironing and managing clothes
  • other housework
  • gardening, mowing and yard work
  • home maintenance
  • car and bike maintenance
  • household shopping and managing household financial affairs

Excludes any household work performed as part of a paid job.

For more information about this topic, please refer to the data quality statement for Domestic Work on the ABS website.

Unpaid care

Derived from the Census question:

'In the last two weeks did the person spend time providing unpaid care, help or assistance to family members or others because of a disability, a long term illness or problems related to old age?'.

Only 2006 and 2011 data are available for this topic as the question was only asked for the first time in 2006.

Includes persons aged 15 years and over.

Includes care given in the two weeks prior to the Census.

Includes unpaid help given to a person with a disability, a long term illness or problems related to old age to assist them with their daily activities. It can include assistance with:

  • bathing, dressing, toileting and feeding
  • mobility
  • understanding or being understood by others
  • emotional support
  • medication
  • dressing wounds
  • food
  • housework
  • driving

For more information about this topic, please refer to the data quality statement for Unpaid Assistance on the ABS website.

Unpaid childcare

Derived from the Census question:

'In the last two weeks did the person spend time looking after a child, without pay?', which specifically asks respondents to differentiate between caring for their own children and caring for others children.

Only 2006 and 2011 data are available for this topic as the question was only asked for the first time in 2006.

Includes persons aged 15 years and over.

Includes the time a person spends caring for a child or children under the age of 15 without being paid, in the two weeks prior to Census.

Excludes caring for children in a paid capacity (e.g. at a child care centre.

'Cared for own child/ren' includes people caring for their own children, whether they usually live with them or not.

'Cared for other child/ren' can include people looking after their own grandchildren or the children of other relatives or the children of friends or neighbours, or involved in unpaid family day care.

For more information about this topic, please refer to the data quality statement for Unpaid Child Care on the ABS website.

Labour force status

Derived from the Census question:

'Last week did the person have a full time or part time job of any kind?'

This topic includes persons aged 15 years and over, and assesses employment in the week prior to the Census.

It is actually derived from 5 Census questions (34, 35, 44, 46 and 47), which look at whether the respondent had a job, if not, whether they were looking for work, and if they were looking for work whether they were able to start in the past week.

To classify full or part-time work, the question on hours worked is also used.

'Employed full time' means having worked 35 hours or more in all jobs.

'Employed part time' means having worked less than 35 hours in all jobs.

Please note that the full or part-time status refers only to the week before Census, not to a ‘usual’ number of hours.

The category of ‘Employed – away from work’ was only available since the 2006 Census. The ABS categorises persons away from work as either employed full time or part time based on usual hours worked. The Census only uses actual hours worked (Q44) to determine whether someone is employed full-time or part-time and a response to Q34 to determine whether they were employed, but away from work. To enable time series comparisons in profile.id, this category has been combined with ‘Employed part-time’.

The 'Labour force' is all persons aged 15 years and over who are either employed or looking for work and available to start. Both full and part-time work counts towards the labour force.

The percentages in the first table, showing employed and unemployed, are expressed as a percentage of those who are in the labour force.

The ‘Unemployment Rate’ is defined as the number of unemployed persons (looking for work and available to start) as a percentage of the labour force. The percentage for ‘Unemployed’ in profile.id is the same as the unemployment rate.

The ‘Participation Rate’ is defined as the labour force expressed as a percentage of the total population aged 15+. In profile.id, the percentage in the ‘Total labour force’ category in the second table can be regarded as the participation rate. Note, however that it is not directly comparable to participation rates derived from the ABS labour force monthly survey, because a proportion of the population (5.6% nationally in 2011) don’t state their labour force status. For this reason, Census participation rates are likely to be a little lower than those derived from the survey, but they are comparable over time and across geographic areas with other Census data.

For more information please refer to the data quality statement for Labour Force Status on the ABS website.

Industry

Derived from the two Census questions:

'What best describes the business of your employer?' and 'What are the main goods produced or main services provided by your employers business?'

This topic describes the industries in which employed people work.

It applies only to persons aged 15 years and over, who were employed in the week prior to Census.

Only 2006 and 2011 data are available for this topic as industry categories changed in 2006 so earlier Census years are not comparable.

Includes the broadest 1-digit classification of industries. More detailed industry breakdowns are available in economy.id and directly from the ABS.

Data for industry are coded using the Australia and New Zealand Standard Industrial Classification 2006 (ANZSIC06). This classification looks at the main economic outputs of an business or organisation to classify it into a broad industry grouping. More information on how this is done is included in the classification.

The industry classification is updated periodically to take account of emerging industries and changes in the structure of the economy. The ANZSIC classification was last updated in 2006.

For more information on this topic please refer to the data quality statement for Industry of Employment on the ABS website.

Occupations

Derived from the two Census questions:

'In the main job held last week, what was the person's occupation?' and 'What are the main tasks that the person himself/herself usually performs in that occupation?'

This topic describes the occupations of employed people who were employed in the week prior to the Census.

It includes only persons aged 15 years and over who were employed in the week prior to Census.

Only 2006 and 2011 data are available for this topic as occupation categories changed in 2006 so earlier Census years are not comparable.

Includes the broadest 1-digit classification of occupations. More detailed occupation breakdowns are available in economy.id or directly from the ABS.

Data for occupation are coded using the Australian and New Zealand Standard Classification of Occupations (ANZSCO) . The occupation classification categorises occupations broadly based on skill level and educational qualifications required.

The occupation classification is updated periodically to take account of emerging occupation groups and changes to the structure of the labour force. The most recent change was in 2006.

Please note that it is not possible to derive an unemployment rate for a specific occupation (eg. how many unemployed truck drivers are there?). This is because occupation is only collected for those who are actually employed. An unemployed person by definition does not have an occupation.

For more information on this topic please refer to the data quality statement for Occupation on the ABS website.

Method of travel to work

Derived from the Census question:

'How did the person get to work on Tuesday, 9 August 2011?'

Method of travel to work relates specifically to the journey to work on the morning of Census day (or later that day for shift workers).

This topic includes only to people aged 15 and over who were employed in the week prior to Census.

Respondents can nominate up to three modes of travel. Because this results in 234 discrete categories based on combinations of 1,2 or 3 modes, this is an unwieldy dataset. For the purposes of profile.id, we have aggregated them into single methods, where certain methods override others. Aggregations are as follows:

'Train' includes any journey involving a train, whether or not other methods were used.

'Bus' includes any journey involving a bus, except for those also involving a train.

‘Tram or Ferry’ includes any journey involving a tram or ferry, except for those involving bus or train. 'Tram' includes light rail. In the 1996 and 1991 Census years, Tram and Ferry were combined as one item, so it is necessary to recombine them in later years in profile.id for reasons of comparability over time.

'Other' refers to any method not listed in the standard categories, plus any combination of two or three methods NOT involving a bus, train, tram or ferry.

The remaining categories refer to a single method of travel (e.g. 'Car as driver' when no other method was used).

'Walked only', 'Worked at home' and 'Did not go to work' are exclusive and never presented in combination with other methods. Where multiple responses are provided on the Census form, which include one of these, these methods override the others.

Further breakdowns of combinations of method of travel to work are available on request from .id for our Local Government Clients, or from the ABS.

For more information please refer to the data quality statement for Method of Travel to Work (MTWP) on the ABS website.

Households summary

Derived from the Census question:

'What is the person's relationship [to each other person in the household]?'

Describes the type of family and non-family households within a dwelling.

Includes all households within occupied private dwellings.

Excludes persons counted in non-private dwellings

'A household' is a group of people living in a private dwelling making shared provision for meals.

'A family' is a group of people living in a private dwelling who are related by blood or marriage (including de-facto marriage and same-sex couples).

Households may contain up to three families each with a different family composition. Family households in this table are classified into broad family type by the family composition of the primary family only. This significantly simplifies the reading of the table. Multiple family households make up a very small proportion of all households (less than 2% nationwide) so this simplification is expected to have negligible effect on the output.

Household data are based on place of enumeration only – people recorded as being temporarily absent from households are included for the purposes of assessing household composition, but where the entire household was away on Census night, residents are not moved back into households by the usual resident process (unoccupied dwellings remain unoccupied).

'Other families' includes any household of related individuals where a parent-child or couple relationship does not exist (e.g. siblings, uncle/nephew, grandparent-grandchild).

'Group household' includes any household consisting of two or more unrelated individuals.

'Visitor only households' includes all households where there were no usual residents of the dwelling present (i.e. all persons in the household were resident elsewhere). An example of this would be a family staying in a holiday apartment. No family information is recorded in this case.

'Other not classifiable' households consist mainly of dwellings which the Census Collector believes were occupied on Census night but from which no form was returned. A small proportion of households in this category are those where only children aged under 15 were present on Census night (no adults).

Same sex couple families are included in this table but not separately identified.

For more information on household and family type, please refer to the data quality statements for Household Composition and Family Composition on the ABS website.

Households with children by life stage

Derived from the Census question:

'What is the person's relationship [to each other person in the household]?'

Presents a subset of household/family type data, based on those households who have children.

Includes households, by the family type of the primary family in the dwelling. Where there is more than one family in a household, the type of family is coded by the "primary family", which is normally the first family recorded on the Census form.

Excludes 'Overseas visitors', but people temporarily absent from households are included in the Census when assessing the household type (e.g. a couple family with an absent partner is still recorded as a couple family if the partner's details are recorded in the "persons temporarily absent" field).

'Children' include either children under 15 (dependent by definition), dependent students aged 15-24, or independent children who are either non-students aged 15-24, or anyone over the age of 25. To be counted in this table, a parent-child relationship must exist in the household.

Couples and single parent families are broken into three 'life stages' based entirely on the age of the children. The age of parents is not a factor in this classification:

'Young children' includes households where all children are aged under 15.

'Mixed age children' includes households where there are children (two or more) both aged under 15, and 15 or over.

'Older children' includes households where all children are aged 15 or over. This can include adult-non dependent children.

Note that to be included in the 'Mixed age children' category a household MUST have more than one child present. A household with one child would move directly from the 'Young children' to the 'Older children' category under this classification.

For more general information about the classification of households in profile.id®, please see the data notes for the Household Summary table.

For more information on household and family type, please refer to the data quality statements for Household Composition and Family Composition on the ABS website.

Households without children by life stage

Derived from the Census question:

'What is the person's relationship [to each other person in the household]?'

Presents a subset of household/family type data, based on couple and lone person households without children.

Includes same-sex couples.

Couples and lone persons are broken into three 'life stages' based on the age of the household reference person. The household reference person is normally 'Person 1' on the Census form, and relationships in the household are defined by reference to this person. Where a child or visitor to the household is listed as person 1, the ABS allocates a different individual on the form to be the household reference person. In the case of a lone person household, the lone person is the household reference person. In the case of a couple it may be either adult. It is no indication of household headship.

'Young' includes households where the household reference person is aged 15-44.

'Middle-aged' includes households where the household reference person is aged 45-64.

'Older' includes households where the household reference person is aged 65+

For more general information about the classification of households in profile.id®, please see the data notes for the 'Household Summary' table.

For more information on household and family type, please refer to the data quality statements for Household Composition and Family Composition on the ABS website.

Household size

Derived from the three Census questions:

'Name of each person including visitors who spent the night of Tuesday, 9 August 2011 in this dwelling', and 'Where does the person usually live?', and 'Are there any persons who usually live in this dwelling who were absent on Census Night (Tuesday, 9 August 2011)?'

Counts households by the number of persons usually resident on Census night.

Includes occupied private dwellings with at least one resident home on Census night.

Includes people who were at home on Census night, and up to three people listed as being temporarily absent from the dwelling.

Excludes people who were in the dwelling but not usually resident there (i.e.visitors).

Excludes households where the entire household was absent on Census night - the dwelling is either unoccupied or has visitors only.

For more information on this topic please see the ABS data quality statement on Number of Persons Usually Resident.

Number of bedrooms

Derived from the Census question:

'How many bedrooms are there in this dwelling?'

Counts the number of rooms used as bedrooms in occupied private dwellings.

Includes occupied private dwellings.

Excludes unoccupied private dwellings because the number of bedrooms is recorded by the householder.

Excludes non-private dwellings.

'None (includes bedsits)' includes bedsits and studios where the living area is also a bedroom.

For more information on this topic please see the ABS data quality statement on Number of Bedrooms.

Housing tenure

Derived from the Census questions:

'Is this dwelling [owned outright, owned with a mortgage etc.]', and 'If this dwelling is being rented, who is it rented from?'

Presents the tenure type of occupied private dwellings, and for those dwellings being rented, provides a breakdown of the type of landlord the dwelling is being rented from.

Includes occupied private dwellings.

'Fully owned' includes dwellings that are owned by its occupants in full, with no mortgage.

'Being purchased' includes all dwellings being paid off with a mortgage, as well as dwellings being purchased under a rent/buy scheme.

'Renting – social housing' includes households renting from a State/Territory Government housing authority (generally referred to as public housing) and households renting from a housing co-operative, community organisation or church group.

'Renting – private' refers to households renting from a real estate agent, a private person or an employer.

'Renting – not stated' refers to households who stated they were renting but did not state their landlord type.

'Other tenure type' includes life tenure schemes, squatting and other forms of occupancy.

Please note that due to a change in wording of the tenure type question between the 2001 and 2006 Censuses, care should be taken in interpreting change between the 2001 Census and either 2006 or 2011. This break in series applies only to the 'Fully owned' and 'Being purchased' categories. The new wording of the question resulted in a higher response to 'Being purchased' (now known on the form as 'Owned with a mortgage', and showing an apparent increase in this category at the expense of 'Fully owned' between 2001 and 2006.

Also note that in 1991, the ‘Other Tenure Type’ category includes ‘Not Stated’ and ‘Inadequately Described’. As such it should not be compared to the ‘Other tenure type’ category for other years. Comparing between 1991 and a later year will show an apparent drop in ‘Other’ and rise in ‘Not Stated’ which is due to the category change. The main rental and ownership categories are unaffected.

For more information on this topic please see the ABS data quality statement on Tenure Type.

Housing loan repayments

Derived from the Census questions:

'How much does your household pay for this dwelling?' and 'Is this dwelling [owned outright, owned with a mortgage etc.]'

Presents monthly housing loan repayments made by a household to purchase the dwelling in which the household was counted on Census night.

Includes households (occupied private dwellings) who are purchasing their dwelling with a mortgage or under a dwelling under a 'rent/buy' scheme.

Includes caravans if they have a mortgage.

Housing loan repayment quartiles

Derived from the Census questions:

'How much does your household pay for this dwelling?' and 'Is this dwelling [owned outright, owned with a mortgage etc.]'

See notes for Housing loan repayments as well.

Housing loan repayment categories are not comparable over time because of the influences of inflation. The quartile method is the most objective method of comparing change in mortgage payments in an area over time.

Mortgage quartiles look at the distribution of mortgage payments among households paying off their home in the Shire of Mundaring relative to Western Australia. Mortgage quartiles are created for Western Australia by ranking all mortgagor households from the lowest payments to the highest payments and then dividing the list into four equal groups or quartiles. This is repeated for each Census period. The table shows the payment categories for each quartile in each Census period.

Quartile group dollar ranges (Housing loan repayments)
Calculated from loan repayment data for Western Australia Monthly housing loan repayments by Census year
Household income ranges
2011
2006
2001
1996
Lowest group $0 to $1,221 $0 to $826 $0 to $605 $0 to $505
Medium lowest $1,222 to $1,969 $827 to $1,241 $606 to $855 $506 to $752
Medium highest $1,970 to $2,786 $1,242 to $1,791 $856 to $1,161 $753 to $1,019
Highest group $2,787 and over $1,792 and over $1,162 and over $1,020 and over

The analysis shows the number and proportion of mortgagor households in the Shire of Mundaring falling into each of the four quartiles.

This gives a clear picture of how mortgage payments in the Shire of Mundaring compare to Western Australia. In Western Australia 25% of persons fall into each category by definition. If, for example, the Shire of Mundaring has 35% in the bottom category and only 15% in the highest, this indicates that the the Shire of Mundaring has proportionally more people paying low mortgage repayments relative to the State, and less high mortgage payments.

More importantly, the dataset for Western Australia is grouped into those four equal categories for the 2011, 2006 and 2001 Census independently. Repeating this process for each Census period, enables a comparison of areas over time, because the quartile becomes a constant, regardless of the dollar amounts involved enabling you to track change in a local area independent of inflation. For example, if the Shire of Mundaring has had an increase in the proportion of households in the top mortgage payment quartile, this indicates that perhaps a large cohort of the population have bought in recently or the area has opened up to first home buyers, or perhaps the price of homes has just increased.

Housing rental payments

Derived from the Census questions:

'How much does your household pay for this dwelling?' and 'Is this dwelling [owned outright, owned with a mortgage etc.]'

Presents weekly rent paid by for the dwelling in which they were counted on Census night.

Includes households (occupied private dwellings) renting their dwelling or occupying it rent free. Australia-wide 3.7% of rented dwellings were occupied rent free.

Includes caravans being rented.

Excludes 'Other not classifiable' households as no information about their tenure type is available.

Note: Rent is a better indicator of the value of housing in an area than mortgage repayments, as the rent paid is less dependent on when the occupants moved in, and there is no equity component which reduces the cost (rent-buy schemes are included as mortgages, not rent).

For more information on this topic please refer to the ABS data quality statement for Weekly Rental Payments.

Housing rental payment quartiles

Derived from the Census questions:

'How much does your household pay for this dwelling?' and 'Is this dwelling [owned outright, owned with a mortgage etc.]'

See data notes for Rental payments as well.

Rental payment categories are not comparable over time because of the influences of inflation. The quartile method is the most objective method of comparing change in the rental payments of an area over time.

Rental payment quartiles look at the distribution of rents among rented households in the Shire of Mundaring relative to Western Australia. Rental quartiles are created for Western Australia by ranking all renting households from the lowest payments to the highest payments and then dividing the list into four equal groups or quartiles. This is repeated for each Census period. The table shows the payment categories for each quartile in each Census period.

Quartile group dollar ranges (Housing rental payments)
Calculated from rental payment data for Western Australia Weekly housing rental payments by Census year
Household income ranges
2011
2006
2001
1996
Lowest group $0 to $1,221 $0 to $826 $0 to $605 $0 to $505
Medium lowest $1,222 to $1,969 $827 to $1,241 $606 to $855 $506 to $752
Medium highest $1,970 to $2,786 $1,242 to $1,791 $856 to $1,161 $753 to $1,019
Highest group $2,787 and over $1,792 and over $1,162 and over $1,020 and over

The analysis shows the number and proportion of renting households in the Shire of Mundaring falling into each of the four quartiles. This gives a clear picture of how rents in the Shire of Mundaring compare to Western Australia. In Western Australia 25% of persons fall into each category by definition. If, for example, the Shire of Mundaring has 35% in the bottom category and only 15% in the highest, this indicates that the Shire of Mundaring has proportionally more people paying low rents relative to the State, and less high rent payers.

More importantly, the dataset for Western Australia is grouped into four equal categories for the 2011, 2006 and 2001 Census independently. Repeating this process for each Census period, enables a comparison of areas over time, because the quartile becomes a constant, regardless of the dollar amounts involved enabling you to track change in a local area independent of inflation. For example, if the Shire of Mundaring has had an increase in the number of households in the top rent payment quartile, this indicates that perhaps the area is gentrifying with rents increasing faster than in other parts of the State.

Type of internet connection

Derived from the Census question:

'Can the Internet be accessed at this dwelling?'

Presents information about the type of Internet connection available in private occupied dwellings.

Only 2006 and 2011 data are available for this topic as the question was asked in this way for the first time in 2006 replacing the questions in the 2001 Census relating to internet use and computer use.

Relates to the dwelling, not individuals – no information is collected on whether individuals use the internet, only whether the internet can be accessed at the dwelling.

'Broadband connection' includes ADSL, Cable, Wireless and Satellite connection.

'Dial-up connection' includes analog modem and ISDN connections.

'Other' includes Internet access through mobile phones, set-top boxes, games machines or connections other than dial-up or broadband.

Time series information for Australia shows that dial-up access has fallen to less than 2% of households, and been overtaken by the 'Other' category. It is likely that the 'Other' category mainly consists of households accessing the internet through their mobile phones.

For more information on this topic, please see the ABS data quality statement on Type of Internet Connection.

Car ownership

Derived from the Census question:

'How many registered motor vehicles owned or used by residents of this dwelling were garaged or parked at or near this dwelling on the night of Tuesday, 9 August 2011?'

Counts the number of registered motor vehicles owned or used by household members, garaged, parked at or near private dwellings on Census night.

Includes households in occupied private dwellings

Includes company owned vehicles

Excludes motorbikes, scooters tractors and push bikes.

Vehicles must be registered and driveable to be counted.

For more information on this topic, please see the ABS data quality statement for Number of Motor Vehicles.

Dwelling type

Derived from the Census:

'Dwelling Type is derived from an assessment by the Census Collector who observes and records the type of dwelling structure.'

Categorises the type and structure of dwellings.

Includes all private dwellings.

This is the only Census output which is classified by the Census collector on visiting the household, not by the respondent to the Census.

The categories used by the ABS are subject to systematic misinterpretation by Census collectors, particularly in determining the difference between semi-detached/townhouses and blocks of flats in 1-2 storey blocks. For this reason, to maintain consistency over time, the categories used here combine these two categories as 'medium density'. This creates a better measure of actual change over time in an area. We have applied the term 'density' here to the structure of the dwelling and not the number of dwellings per hectare.

'Separate house' includes all free-standing dwellings separated from neighbouring dwellings by a gap of at least half a metre.

'Medium density' includes all semi-detached, row, terrace, townhouses and villa units, plus flats and apartments in blocks of 1 or 2 storeys, and flats attached to houses.

'High density' includes flats and apartments in 3 storey and larger blocks.

'Caravans, cabins, houseboats' includes all such mobile accommodation, both inside and outside caravan parks (including caravans in private backyards.

'Other' includes houses and flats attached to shops or offices, and improvised homes, tents and sleepers out on Census night.

'Unoccupied dwellings' are shown in a separate table. An unoccupied dwelling is a dwelling where the Census Collector determined that it was vacant on Census night. Where a collector cannot determine this, the dwelling is usually treated as occupied. Dwellings may be unoccupied for a variety of reasons including:

  • Residents away temporarily.
  • Dwelling vacant or for sale.
  • Dwelling derelict.
  • Dwelling used as a holiday home and currently not being used.

'Non-private dwellings' are dwellings which provide a communal form of accommodation such as Hotels, Motels, Nursing Homes, Hospitals, Army Barracks, Staff Quarters, Boarding Houses, Homeless shelters, Youth hostels and Ski Lodges.

At approximately 0.1% he non-response rate for this variable is very low, because it is answered by the collector and imputed by the Data Processing Centre from surrounding dwellings and other information where the collector has not stated it.

Please note that in previous versions of profile.id the breakdown of dwelling structure related only to occupied dwellings. This has now been extended to all private dwellings, including unoccupied ones, with data consistent back to 1991.

For more information on this topic, please see the ABS data quality statements on Dwelling Structure and Dwelling Type.

Seifa index of disadvantage

The SEIFA indexes are derived from Census data by a method called Principal Component Analysis which is a regression technique that derives an index from a set of variables related to the concept of disadvantage, based on the level of correlation between those variables.

There are four indexes in the SEIFA set:

  • Index of Relative Socio-Economic Disadvantage
  • Index of Relative Socio-Economic Advantage/Disadvantage
  • Index of Economic Resources
  • Index of Education and Occupation

Of these, by far the most commonly used is the Index of Relative Socio-Economic Disadvantage (IRSED), and this is the one presented in profile.id®.

The IRSED compares the level of disadvantage between areas, and is not skewed by a high level of advantage. Technically a high score only measures a lack of disadvantage – NOT evidence of advantage).

ISRED is derived from the relative proportions of 17 Census characteristics such as:

  • Low income
  • Low educational attainment
  • High unemployment
  • Residents working in relatively unskilled occupations
  • High proportion of residents with poor English proficiency
  • High proportion of single parent families
  • High proportion of residents paying low rent

For more details on the construction of the index, plus further information on its use, see (Australian Bureau of Statistics, 2011, Socio-Economic Indexes for Areas (SEIFA 2011) cat. no. 2033.0.55.001) on the ABS website.

The Index of Disadvantage is primarily used to rank areas to apply funding models which address need in the community, e.g. providing more funding for schools in disadvantaged areas.

A low SEIFA score for an area does not necessarily imply anything about individuals living in the area as the score is for the area overall. While a low score probably indicates many low income people living there, it does not imply that any particular resident is low income.

SEIFA indexes cannot be directly compared over time. The analysis is re-run every Census and different variables are found to be correlated. For this reason only the latest SEIFA figures are presented on the site. Older indexes are available on request, but only the relative ranking of areas can be compared, rather than the numbers directly.

For more information about the use of SEIFA please refer to the ABS publication above or contact .id.

Residential location of workers

Derived from the Census:

'For the main job held last week, what was the person's workplace address?'

This dataset is known as Journey to Work, and is derived from Census question 41 – "For the main job held last week, what was the person's workplace address?" With residential address also known, Journey to Work comprises a matrix linking origin (residence) and work destination.

The data presented here in table form show the Statistical Local Area of residence for employed persons who work within Shire of Mundaring. The map shows the spatial distribution of these workers.

Please note that the workforce in a Local Government Area calculated from Census data is generally considered to be an undercount, due to the number of people whose workplace address was not stated, could not be accurately coded, or stated a non-permanent workplace address ('no fixed place of work'). These people appear in the employment data at their residential location but cannot be coded to a work destination.

In 2011, a record number (over 1 million or 10% of employed persons) have been coded to an undefined work destination which cannot be mapped, and so these are excluded from the working population. For this reason some LGAs may notice an apparent drop in their Census-based workforce numbers between 2006 and 2011. While only 2011 data are presented here, this is most likely the reason.

If comparing work destination information with Method of Travel to work, please note the differing time periods – Workplace address relates to the week prior to Census, while Method of Travel relates to the morning of Census day. This has a negligible effect on the total counts but can explain some of the small numbers of strange LGA-LGA pairings which crop up such as people appearing to travel interstate to work. Some of these may be genuinely Fly-in/Fly-out workers (likely if the work destination is a known mining area), but others may have moved address in the differing timeframes assessed by the two questions.

Work location of residents

Derived from the Census:

'For the main job held last week, what was the person's workplace address?'

This dataset is known as Journey to Work, and is derived from Census question 41 – "For the main job held last week, what was the person's workplace address?" With residential address also known, Journey to Work comprises a matrix linking origin (residence) and work destination.

The data presented here in table form show the Statistical Local Area of work destination for employed persons who live within Shire of Mundaring. The map shows the spatial distribution of where these residents work.

Please note that not all employed persons can be accurately coded to a workplace address. In 2011, a record number (over 1 million or 10% of employed persons) have been coded to an undefined work destination. These undefined locations are broken down by state, and shown in the table, but they cannot be mapped, as there is no information on the geographic location of work apart from their state.

For this reason, there may be difficulty comparing 2011 work destination data to 2006, and only 2011 data are presented here. This very large increase in undefined workplace location is believed to be due to the change to the new geography standard (ASGS), and the inefficient coding mechanisms used to code to it.

If comparing work destination information with Method of Travel to work, please note the differing time periods – Workplace address relates to the week prior to Census, while Method of Travel relates to the morning of Census day. This has a negligible effect on the total counts but can explain some of the small numbers of strange LGA-LGA pairings which crop up such as people appearing to travel interstate to work. Some of these may be genuinely Fly-in/Fly-out workers (likely if the work destination is a known mining area), but others may have moved address in the differing timeframes assessed by the two questions.

For more information please refer to the data quality statement for Place of Work on the ABS website.

Migration summary

Derived from the Census questions:

'Where does the person usually live?' and 'Where did the person usually live five years ago (at 9 August 2006)'.

Migration information is collected by the ABS by a series of questions asking where a person usually lived 1 year and 5 years prior to Census day. Only 5-year migration figures are presented here.

The table population is all persons resident in the area on Census night, and it is broken down by their previous location, within the area, within the same state, interstate, overseas or an unknown area.

The total of residents who moved within the same state includes a small percentage who were coded by the ABS to the “State undefined” category. There is a possibility that some of these may have been resident in the local area and have been incorrectly coded, but this is likely to have negligible impact on the overall percentages in each category.

Note that migration between 2006 and 2011 is only applicable for those persons aged 5 years and over on Census day 2011. Residents who were born in the interim cannot have a usual address 5 years ago. As the percentages are calculated on the total population, areas with high proportions of 0-4 year olds may have correspondingly lower percentages in the categories of movement.

Migration to and from

Derived from the Census questions:

'Where does the person usually live?' and 'Where did the person usually live five years ago (at 9 August 2006)'.

Migration information is collected by the ABS by a series of questions asking where a person usually lived 1 year and 5 years prior to Census day. Only 5-year migration figures are presented here.

This table shows the in, out and net migration figures for people (aged 5+) who moved within different geographic areas.

‘In migration’ relates to people who in 2011 lived within Shire of Mundaring, but 5 years earlier (in 2006) lived elsewhere (in the area listed in the rows).

‘Out migration’ relates to people who in 2011 lived elsewhere in Australia (in the area listed in the rows), but who stated that in 2006 they lived in Shire of Mundaring.

‘Net migration’ equals ‘In migration’ minus ‘Out migration’.

The LGA tables are ranked by the areas of largest positive and negative net migration respectively. The state tables show all states and territories, regardless of the level of migration gain or loss.

The total of residents who moved within the same state includes a small percentage who were coded by the ABS to the ‘State undefined’ category. There is a possibility that some of these may have been resident in the local area and have been incorrectly coded. For the purposes of this table, however, all residents in ‘State undefined’ 5 years ago who lived in Shire of Mundaring in 2011 are counted as movement into the area.

The summary table shows in and out migration within the same state, to other states, and overseas. Please note that it is not possible to calculate a net migration figure for overseas, as the Census doesn’t count people who are overseas on Census day. So we only have data on those who moved in from overseas.

Migration by age

Derived from the Census questions:

'Where does the person usually live?' and 'Where did the person usually live five years ago (at 9 August 2006)'.

Migration information is collected by the ABS by a series of questions asking where a person usually lived 1 year and 5 years prior to Census day. Only 5-year migration figures are presented here.

The migration by age figures show the number of people who moved in and out of Shire of Mundaring between 2006 and 2011, by their age group.

The age groups used correspond with the ages shown in the ‘Service Age Groups’ page under ‘What is the population?’. They are used because these age groups correlate highly with life stages when people are likely to make housing decisions and move (eg. leaving home, starting a family, retirement).

‘In migration’ relates to people who in 2011 lived within Shire of Mundaring, but 5 years earlier (in 2006) lived elsewhere in Australia.

‘Out migration’ relates to people who in 2011 lived elsewhere in Australia (in the area listed in the rows), but who stated that in 2006 they lived in Shire of Mundaring.

‘Net migration’ equals ‘In migration’ minus ‘Out migration’.

Please note that overseas migration is NOT included in this table, which relates only to migration within Australia. It is possible to have increasing population even if net migration of all age groups is negative, due to births and overseas migration.

For more information please refer to the ABS Data Quality Statement for Place of Usual Residence 5 years Ago on the ABS website.

Estimated Resident Population (ERP)

This dataset presents the last 10 years' official population estimates for the Shire of Mundaring, including numerical and percentage change year on year, and comparison to the selected benchmark.

Estimated Resident Population is the official population of an area, if that area is based on one of the ABS standard geographic units (SA2s, LGAs). It adjusts for the net undercount found in Census data, people overseas on Census night, and is updated annually based on the number of registered births, deaths, and an estimate of overseas, interstate and intra-state migration.

While ERP is the most accurate measure of population at any point in time, it is subject to revision. Minor revisions are made each year to previous years' populations, and a final revision to the previous 5 years' results happens after each Census when the results are 'rebased' to the results of the most recent Census. This rebasing can alter populations significantly, depending on the Census findings, and indeed this is one of the reason we have a Census every 5 years.

Despite this revision, the ERP remains the official population count, and is used in allocation of funding at all levels of government, and the distribution of electorates by the Australian Electoral Commission.

Building approvals

Residential building approvals are compiled by the Australian Bureau of Statistics from permits issued by: local government authorities and other principal certifying authorities.

The data on this page counts the number of dwelling units created by the issue of building permits, regardless of the number of actual permits (eg. a single permit for a block of 50 apartments would count in this table as 50).

  • A residential building is a building consisting of one or more dwelling units. Residential buildings can be either houses or other residential buildings.
    • A house is defined as a stand-alone residential structure, separated on all sides from other dwellings by at least half a metre.
    • An other residential building is a building other than a house primarily used for long-term residential purposes. An other residential building contains more than one dwelling unit within the same structure – for example - semi-detached, row or terrace houses; flats, unit or apartments in blocks, or flats attached to houses or shops.

Exclusions:

  • Dwellings created by alterations/additions to existing dwellings are not included.
  • Dwellings created by building work which is largely non-residential in nature (eg. a caretaker’s dwelling built as part of a new hospital) are also not included as dwelling units, though they are included in value of approval data (not presented in profile.id).

For more information on the building approvals dataset, please refer to ABS catalogue number 8731.0 – Building Approvals, Australia.